Why might my Diastasis Recti (Abdominal Separation) not be healing?

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If you think about it, our bodies do a great job at healing diastasis recti (abdominal separation of the linea alba, or fascia), between the rectus abdominus muscle in some women.  Our female figures were made to have this wonderful fascia in our abdomen (line alba) to stretch to accommodate a growing baby and uterus.  Pretty amazing stuff!!

Studies have found 100% of pregnant women will have diastasis recti at 35 weeks gestation and by 6 months postpartum, only 40% of women will continue to have it.  

I am currently 4 months postpartum with my third baby.  I have been consistent with my exercises and stretches in my Body After Birth plan and have noticed an easier closure of my diastasis recti this go around.  

Stretching is just as important as strengthening your muscles.  As a mommy who is carrying baby, stretching is a big part of improving your diastasis.  If you abdominal muscles or low back muscles are tight, they can continue to pull at the linea alba causing your diastasis to stay around. Also, switch up what side you are holding your baby on to make all your muscles work.  And last, try to stand or sit in proper posture when holding your little one (avoid pregnancy stance) to keep your abdominal muscles working for you, instead of stretching out when you are leaning back.  If you find yourself standing in the pregnancy stance, your muscles may not be strong enough to hold baby so make it an exercise.  Practice holding baby in good posture for 5 minutes while doing household activities and see if you are still in proper posture at the end of the 5 minutes (or while baby wearing).  Build your core muscles up to support you and your future self!

 

 

 Child's Pose stretch to stretch our low back. Try hands forward, and then to each side, holding off at least 5 breaths. 

Child's Pose stretch to stretch our low back. Try hands forward, and then to each side, holding off at least 5 breaths.