cesarean

What Happens During a Cesarean Birth?

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This is an area that as women, even those of us who have HAD a cesarean birth,  we know little about.  Cesarean births can be planned or unplanned.  Planned are scheduled ahead of time and unplanned can happen after pushing for long periods, or when needing to deliver baby quickly, like in my first delivery.  There are lots of different reasons for an unplanned cesarean.  

During the cesarean delivery, the doctor makes an incision into your skin, through your fat cells, connective tissue and into the abdominal cavity.

The abdominal muscles are spread apart and the bladder is moved so the doctor can get to the uterus.  An incision is made into the uterus and the baby is guided out.  After the placenta is removed, then the uterus is stitched up, the bladder is put back, the connective tissue and abdominals, and then the skin is stitched up.  A lot of layers of sutures within the tissues so scar tissue develops as you heal.

Please note, your abdominal muscles are not cut through during a cesarean birth, but your connective tissue is.  This is important to understand why we need recovery programs after birth, not just “sit ups” and running as soon as we feel like it.  

 

"I had a csection, so why do I need to heal my pelvic floor?"

This is a question I seem to get quite often. "I had a csection, so why do I need to heal my pelvic floor?"

During pregnancy, your pelvic floor muscles are compromised and stretched with weight of growing baby and uterus.  This can cause the pelvic floor muscles to be more lax than normal.  Changes in posture during pregnancy, also cause changes to pelvic floor muscles.  For example, standing with your butt tucked under to accommodate growing belly, can cause tightness and change in tone in your pelvic floor muscles.  This can lead to pelvic floor dysfunction (urgency, frequency, leaking of urine, pelvic pain). 

Pelvic floor muscles are also involved if you pushed prior to cesarean birth.  Also, cesarean scars can cause issues with nerve function to the pelvic floor, where you might develop pelvic pain with sex, urethral burning, or feeling of needing to pee all the time.  It is important to get the pelvic floor muscles to function properly with your “core” after birth.  See a pelvic floor physical therapist to re-train your pelvic floor muscles and core to function properly again as you care for your family at home or during an exercise routine.  

Seeing a pelvic floor physical therapist postpartum is ideal.  If you are looking for someone in your area and would like a recommendation, just let me know!!